Friday, January 2, 2015

Q&A - It’s All About Results, According to the Health And Fitness Experts At YOR Health

YOR Health
When it comes to diet and exercise, no one has a better group of experts than the Athletic Advisory Board of YOR Health. In this Q&A the Irvine, California-based nutritional supplement company answers questions about how to get - and stay - fit.
 
Q: Is one type of exercise enough?
 
YOR Health: A combination of different movements is the most effective way to keep the body strong. Exercise isn’t just about burning fat but should also focus on building lean muscle mass and strengthening the body from the inside out. A fitness routine that incorporates strength and flexibility training with aerobic exercise is preferable over just lifting weights or running on the treadmill.

Q: Why is it important to “warm up” prior to a hard workout or cardiovascular exercise?
 
YOR Health: The body needs a bit of preparation before being launched into full-blown workout mode. A few minutes of stretching or a brisk walk will help limber up muscles and ease the cardiovascular system into a performance state. Cooling down is important, too, since a quick drop in heart rate encourages lactic acid build-up in muscle tissue, which can cause uncomfortable cramping.

Q: How quickly can the body shed pounds safely?
 
YOR Health: A sudden drop in body weight isn’t a good idea. This is mostly because crash diets and exercise fads encourage unhealthy behavior. Patience, moderation, and perseverance are the keys to a healthy lifestyle. It’s all about getting results but only if the results are sustainable and don’t cause the body more harm than good. Most experts agree that one to two pounds a week is enough.

Q: How does diet relate to exercise?
 
YOR Health: Simply stated: the body needs fuel to move and food is fuel. A balanced diet that includes vegetables, lean meats, carbohydrates, and healthy fats is needed to sustain that energy to keep the body going. Without a proper meal plan, the body – and the mind – get sluggish and ultimately give up on healthy habits.